(Part 2) The Force/Velocity Curve – Building Velocity

Earlier this week I sent out an article discussing the Force/Velocity Curve and using an athletes physical strength and weaknesses to build a training program that allows them to maximize their training results. (View the Force/Velocity article here)

To take that topic a step forward this article will discuss how an athlete would train to increase their velocity.

For starters, it is important to mention a fundamental rule of strength and conditioning.  This is the “S.A.I.D. Principal

S.A.I.D. stands for Specific Adaptations to Imposed Demands.

Essentially, what this principle says is that the body will adapt to whatever method of training it is given. Simply put if you train to get faster, you will get faster. Likewise, is you train for strength you will get stronger.

As we know from the first installment of this series athletes who have a high need for velocity-based training are those looking to improve their on-field speed and quickness. In weight room metrics these athletes are those who lack in plyometric ability and tend to move barbells at a slower rate of speed.

For these athletes, we assess them in a number of areas…

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The Futures Program – Starts November 12th

At Outlaw: SFR we have one overarching goal that we aim to achieve with all of our athletes…

…we want to develop athletes who can perform at a high level on a consistent basis.

This means that we train them in a way that teaches them how to develop power and explosiveness while simultaneously training them to prevent injuries.

For us, this all starts with how the athletes are introduced to strength training…

In our program, the starting point is called The Futures which is a fundamental training course for athletes ages 12-14 years old.

I started The Futures program in May of 2017 with the goal to teach 12-14yr old athletes how to lift properly and train to be explosive.  To date, we have had 40+ athletes complete the program and have seen remarkable results in all testing areas. Our next group of athletes will start training on November 12th.  […]

You Can Only Produce What You Can Absorb 

I get it…

I like the “fast and loud” aspect of athletics just as much as you do.

It’s explosive, powerful, and down-right impressive when an athlete demonstrates sheer power and athleticism.

However, just like with all things, this is not something that happens by chance and this is not something that can happen repeatedly without some deliberate maintenance.
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Lacrosse Athletes // A Case for Strength 

Over the past few years, I have seen a huge influx in the number of Lacrosse athletes who enter my program.

What I find shocking about Lacrosse athletes is that very few of them actually want to lift weights….

What blows my mind about this is that they all want to play in college where every single team bangs weights year-round.

Every…Single…Team…

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The GHR // Building Thoroughbreds

Training youth athletes is about building a foundation for long team athletic success.

This means taking a very structured approach to how you develop them and what areas you focus your largest emphasis on.

For me, I believe the most important area an athlete needs to focus on is the development of the posterior chain. The Posterior Chain is the muscle grouping of the upper back (trapezoids and posterior deltoid), low back (erector spinae), glutes, and hamstrings.

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ACL and Knee Injury Prevention

We all know just how big of an issue ACL tears and other knee injuries are. However it is an alarming trend that very few athletes or strength programs spend time focusing on ACL injury prevention. With such a high occurrence of this injury, and taking into account the severity, shouldn’t there be more time be dedicated to prevention?[…]