(Part 2) The Force/Velocity Curve – Building Velocity

Earlier this week I sent out an article discussing the Force/Velocity Curve and using an athletes physical strength and weaknesses to build a training program that allows them to maximize their training results. (View the Force/Velocity article here)

To take that topic a step forward this article will discuss how an athlete would train to increase their velocity.

For starters, it is important to mention a fundamental rule of strength and conditioning.  This is the “S.A.I.D. Principal

S.A.I.D. stands for Specific Adaptations to Imposed Demands.

Essentially, what this principle says is that the body will adapt to whatever method of training it is given. Simply put if you train to get faster, you will get faster. Likewise, is you train for strength you will get stronger.

As we know from the first installment of this series athletes who have a high need for velocity-based training are those looking to improve their on-field speed and quickness. In weight room metrics these athletes are those who lack in plyometric ability and tend to move barbells at a slower rate of speed.

For these athletes, we assess them in a number of areas…

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